"My work is glamorous, romantic, and nostalgic. I use mixed materials to transform stories into small objects that adorn, identify and relate what you wear with what’s in your heart. I’m inspired by the soul, the spirit, nature, green hues, all kinds of flowers, searching for freedom, wood textures, imperfect aesthetics, Mexico, tribal cultures, exotic garments and the deepness of the sea. All of these influences mix to create unique pieces with a strong concept." — Elsa

Read more» Featured Shop: Ikcha | The Etsy Blog)

"We carefully consider garden harvest varieties, and then design a unique piece of tableware that serves as its ideal counterpart. Our signature process is a trompe l’oeil technique; our green porcelain berry baskets serve to bring the look and feel of farmers’ markets to the kitchen and home. In the end, we aim to offer heirloom-quality vessels that beautifully and functionally display fruits and vegetables straight from your garden for mealtimes and entertaining."

Read more» Featured Shop: Heirloom Home and Studio | The Etsy Blog

archivesofamericanart:

Meet Toshiko Takaezu: a potter who (like all potters) was not afraid to play with fire. In our oral history interview with her, she reflects on why she became a potter:

…the impact that I got from women potters, the strength that you could feel, the strength that is in the pot, made me feel that I really like this…and to have such an impression that I got from the pottery that the women made and the force that they had with the piece, and they didn’t make to have it in the galleries and the museum, they make because they can use it.

- Oral history interview with Toshiko Takaezu, 2003 June 16
Original, un-gif-ed image:
Toshiko Takaezu throwing a ceramic pot, 1974 / Evon Streetman, photographer. Toshiko Takaezu papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

This is awesome!

archivesofamericanart:

Meet Toshiko Takaezu: a potter who (like all potters) was not afraid to play with fire. In our oral history interview with her, she reflects on why she became a potter:

…the impact that I got from women potters, the strength that you could feel, the strength that is in the pot, made me feel that I really like this…and to have such an impression that I got from the pottery that the women made and the force that they had with the piece, and they didn’t make to have it in the galleries and the museum, they make because they can use it.

- Oral history interview with Toshiko Takaezu, 2003 June 16

Original, un-gif-ed image:

Toshiko Takaezu throwing a ceramic pot, 1974 / Evon Streetman, photographer. Toshiko Takaezu papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

This is awesome!

Reblogged from SMITHSONIAN ARCHIVES OF AMERICAN ART